Brad Little – ID

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Former Positions: Lt. Governor from 2009 – 2019; State Senator from 2001 – 2009

Brad Little served as the 42nd lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2009 to 2019 and as an Idaho state senator from 2001 to 2009.

Quotes: 
Brad Little is committed to making decisions through one lens: the lens of ensuring Idaho’s children and grandchildren have the best opportunities to stay in Idaho and for the ones who have left to return.

Brad has advocated his whole life for limited government. He works to ensure the lightest possible hand of government in the lives of Idaho’s citizens, and he seeks to build the public’s confidence in State government.

A candid conversation with Idaho Gov. Brad Little

OnAir Post: Brad Little – ID

Summary

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Former Positions: Lt. Governor from 2009 – 2019; State Senator from 2001 – 2009

Brad Little served as the 42nd lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2009 to 2019 and as an Idaho state senator from 2001 to 2009.

Quotes: 
Brad Little is committed to making decisions through one lens: the lens of ensuring Idaho’s children and grandchildren have the best opportunities to stay in Idaho and for the ones who have left to return.

Brad has advocated his whole life for limited government. He works to ensure the lightest possible hand of government in the lives of Idaho’s citizens, and he seeks to build the public’s confidence in State government.

A candid conversation with Idaho Gov. Brad Little

OnAir Post: Brad Little – ID

News

About

Source: Government page

Brad LittleThe people of Idaho elected Brad Little to be their Governor in November of 2018 and reelected him in November of 2022. He has served as Idaho’s 33rd Governor since January 7, 2019.

Governor Little is an Emmett native who was raised on his family’s sheep and cattle ranching operation. He graduated from the University of Idaho in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, and has worked in the ranching industry for his entire professional life. In 1978, Brad had good fortune and married Teresa Soulen of Weiser.

Teresa and Brad are the proud parents of two sons who have wonderful wives – Adam and Angela, and David and Kelsey. They have six beautiful grandchildren.

Governor Little has a heart for public service. He first served in public office in 2001 when he was selected to fill a Senate vacancy. He was then elected to four consecutive terms to the Idaho Senate. During his service as a Senator, Brad was elected by his Republican peers during his first full term to serve in Party leadership as Majority Caucus Chair. He then served as Idaho’s 37th Lt. Governor starting on January 6, 2009.

Governor Little is committed to making decisions through one lens: the lens of ensuring Idaho’s children and grandchildren have the best opportunities to stay in Idaho and for the ones who have left to choose to return. His time as Governor has been marked by historic investments in education and infrastructure and unprecedented tax relief.

Governor Little has advocated his whole life for limited government, and Idaho achieved the title “least regulated state” during his first term. He works to ensure the lightest possible hand of government in the lives of Idaho’s citizens, and he seeks to build the public’s confidence in state government.

Personal

Full Name: Brad Little

Gender: Male

Family: Wife: Teresa; 2 Children: Adam, David

Birth Date: 02/15/1954

Birth Place: Emmett, ID

Home City: Emmett, ID

Religion: Episcopalian

Source: Vote Smart

Education

S, Agribusiness, University of Idaho, 1972-1977

Political Experience

Governor, State of Idaho, 2019-present

President, Idaho State Senate, 2009-2019

Lieutenant Governor, State of Idaho, 2009-2019

Senator, Idaho State Senate, 2001-2009

Professional Experience

Operator, Little Enterprises, Incorporated

Owner/General Partner, Little Land and Livestock Company, 1979-2016

Office

Office of the Governor
State Capitol
PO Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720

Phone: (208) 334-2100
Fax: (208) 854-3036

Contact

Email: Government

Web Links

Politics

Source: none

Election Results

To learn more, go to this wikipedia section in this post.

Finances

Source: Open Secrets

New Legislation

Issues

Source: Government page

Education

Gov. Little has said we have a constitutional and moral obligation to our students in Idaho. Gov. Little’s top priority is creating abundant opportunities for our children to thrive in school. Schools partner with parents in the education of Idaho students, and they are the hub of activity in our communities.

The best way to achieve Gov. Little’s goal of making Idaho the place where our children and grandchildren choose to stay is by equipping them with the skills they need to become lifelong learners and eventual participants in our state’s workforce.

  • LITERACY – Our children need to learn to read by third grade so our investments in the education system later on can have the most impact. With additional investments sought by Gov. Little, funding for literacy programs – including summer reading programs, full day Kindergarten, and others – will have increased five-fold since he took office in 2019.
  • TEACHER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION – Teachers partner with families in the education of our children, and they can have profound impacts on students’ lives. The teaching profession must be competitive. Under Gov. Little, Idaho has made significant investments in the career ladder so we can better recruit new teachers and retain ones with a lot of experience.
  • WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT – Improved coordination between Idaho businesses, high schools, career technical education, and our college and university system has resulted in more ways for Idahoans to connect an education to a career. Under Gov. Little, Idaho has advanced more apprenticeships, job training, and scholarships for Idahoans to pursue the skills needed to fill in-demand professions.

Cutting Red Tape

In Gov. Little’s first year as Idaho Governor, we surpassed South Dakota and achieved the title of least regulated state in the country.

Since Gov. Little took office in 2019, Idaho has cut or simplified 95-percent of regulations, transforming our administrative code. We’ve taken other steps since then to ensure Idaho regulations remain streamlined, user-friendly, and easy to understand. Gov. Little’s Zero-Based Regulation initiative will continue to eliminate red tape moving forward while maintaining safety.

Cutting red tape has been a key achievement and unrelenting focus of Gov. Little’s. In fact, Gov. Little’s regulatory reform efforts have been so successful that the Legislature saw fit to make the Governor’s Zero-Based Regulation efforts permanent in 2023 by requiring agencies to undergo review of their rule chapters every eight years.

Here’s how we did it:

  1. Within his first few weeks in office, Gov. Little issued two executive orders aimed at scaling back regulations – the Red Tape Reduction Act and Licensing Freedom Act of 2019.
  2. Gov. Little’s Zero-Based Regulation executive order in 2020 forces a routine review of rule chapters annually.
  3. Gov. Little directed state agencies to find efficiencies in the rules they administer as part of the “rules reauthorization process,” under which Idaho’s administrative code expires if it is not reauthorized.
  4. Gov. Little signed an executive order in 2020 shrinking the size of state government by consolidating 11 separate agencies in the new Division of Occupational and Professional Licenses, a move that has led to efficiencies and resulted in better service at a lower cost for Idahoans.
“Here in Idaho, we are demonstrating that if you roll up your sleeves, stay focused on your goal, and work effectively with others, you can get things done. When we reduce regulatory friction, good jobs follow.”
Gov. Little

More Information

Services

Source: Government page

Wikipedia

Bradley Jay Little (born February 15, 1954) is an American politician serving as the 33rd governor of Idaho since January 2019. A member of the Republican Party, he served as the 42nd lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2009 to 2019 and as an Idaho state senator from 2001 to 2009.

Little is a graduate of the University of Idaho, having earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1976. He has been involved in public service since the 1980s. Little was appointed as an Idaho state senator by governor Dirk Kempthorne in 2001, a position he held for just under eight years. During his senate seating, Little chaired the majority caucus and represented the 8th and (after redistricting in 2002) 11th legislative districts.[1] In 2009, Governor Butch Otter appointed Little to the office of lieutenant governor after the previous lieutenant governor, Jim Risch, resigned to become a United States Senator.

After Otter declined to run for a fourth term, Little ran for governor in the 2018 gubernatorial election and defeated Democratic nominee Paulette Jordan.[2] He was reelected in 2022 with 60.5% of the vote, defeating Democratic nominee Stephen Heidt and Independent candidate Ammon Bundy.[3]

Early life and education

Little was born and raised in Emmett, Idaho and graduated from Emmett High School in 1972.[4] He attended the University of Idaho in Moscow,[5] was a member of the Idaho Alpha chapter of Phi Delta Theta fraternity,[6][7] and earned a B.S. in agribusiness in 1976.

Career

Little at his 2011 inauguration, with U.S. Senator Jim Risch and their wives

Little has had an extensive dual career tending to his family’s ranching interests (his grandfather was the “Idaho Sheep King”)[4] and in public service. During the 1981 and 1985 legislative sessions, Little represented his father, David Little, in the Senate on a temporary appointment due to illness, during which time he served on the Finance and Resources Committees.[8] Little also managed his family’s ranching operation, Little Land and Livestock, for almost 30 years until his son, David, became manager in 2009 when Little was appointed lieutenant governor.[9] He continues to work as the head of Little Enterprises, Inc. (a diversified farming and cattle operation), and is a member of the board of directors of Performance Design Inc., a small Boise-based manufacturing company.[9]

Little has also been involved in a variety of private organizations and companies based in Idaho and the Mountain West. He is a former chairman of the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry (IACI), “The Voice of Business in Idaho”, and was a member of its board for 20 years (1981–2001).[10] Little is also the former vice-chairman of the Idaho Community Foundation and the Emmett Public School Foundation, and the former director of the Idaho Wool Growers Association and the University of Idaho Foundation.[9][11][12] He has also served in the past on the boards of directors of High Country News, Home Federal Bank, a small Idaho-based regional bank recently acquired by Bank of the Cascades, and the Idaho Foundation for Excellence in Education.[13][14]

State senator (2001–2009)

Governor Dirk Kempthorne appointed Little to fill a state senate vacancy in May 2001. He represented what was at the time District 8, which covered a part of Gem County surrounding and north of Emmett, all of Boise, Valley, and Adams Counties, and the southern portion of Idaho County.[15][16]

After a change in district boundaries due to redistricting in 2001–02, Little was elected in the fall of 2002 to District 11, which then encompassed all of Gem County and the northern portion of Canyon County, including the communities of Middleton and Parma.[17][18] He was reelected senator from the 11th legislative district four times.[19][20][21] Little was also elected in 2003 by his Republican peers to the party leadership position of Majority Caucus Chair, which he held until 2009.[22]

Committee assignments

  • Agricultural Affairs 2002
  • Resources and Environment 2002
  • State Affairs 2003–2009
  • Resources & Environment 2003–2009
  • Transportation 2003–2009
  • Economic Outlook
  • Revenue Assessment

State Senator from District 11: 2002 results[23][24]

Republican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPct
Brad Little3,86572.1Mike Pullin1,49827.9
Republican PartyVotesPctIndependentVotesPct
Brad Little8,47876.2John Steinebach2,64623.8

State Senator from District 11: 2004 results[25][26]

Republican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPct
Brad Little3,40265.00Steven Thayn1,39826.71Walter Bayes4348.29
Republican PartyVotesPct
Brad Little13,533100.00

State Senate from District 11: 2006 results[27][28]

Republican PartyVotesPctConstitution PartyVotesPct
Brad Little10,09077.05Jared Eastley3,00622.95

State Senate from District 11: 2008 results[29][30]

Republican PartyVotesPctIndependentVotesPct
Brad Little14,87077.5Kirsten Faith Richardson4,30922.5

Lieutenant governor of Idaho (2009–2019)

Little presiding over the Idaho Senate in 2011

Appointment, election and reelection

In January 2009, Governor Butch Otter appointed Little to the office of lieutenant governor to fill the vacancy left by former Lieutenant Governor Jim Risch‘s election to the U.S. Senate in 2008. Little was sworn in by Otter on January 6, 2009, and confirmed by unanimous consent when the Idaho Senate convened on January 12.[31][32]

Little was elected lieutenant governor in 2010, defeating two opponents in the primary election and two opponents from the Democratic and Constitution parties in the general election.[33][34] He was reelected in 2014.

Lieutenant Governor of Idaho: 2010 results[35]

Republican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPct
Brad Little95,75867.6Joshua Blessinger26,80818.9Steven Dana Pankey19,09613.5
Republican PartyVotesPctDemocratic PartyVotesPctConstitution PartyVotesPct
Brad Little299,97967.8%Eldon Wallace120,17427.2%Paul Venable22,0075.0%
Lieutenant Governor of Idaho: 2014 results[36]

Republican PartyVotesPctRepublican PartyVotesPct
Brad Little96,78066.8Jim Chmelik48,09933.2
Republican PartyVotesPctDemocratic PartyVotesPctConstitution PartyVotesPct
Brad Little271,26862.8%Bert Marley141,91732.9%David Hartigan18,7054.3%

Economic development and trade missions

Little focused on economic development as lieutenant governor, helping persuade energy bar producer Clif Bar to build a new food manufacturing plant in Idaho in 2013.[37][38]

Little also took part in and led several trade missions. He led a Friendship Mission to Basque Country in Spain in 2010, during which he met President of the Basque Government Patxi López. During this meeting, Little and López agreed to establish a Basque Economic Development Office in Boise that “would provide resources and services for Idaho and Basque companies to ease collaboration on research, sales and collaborative programs.”[39] Little later signed the Euskadi-Idaho Friendship Agreement, which affirms the friendship and cultural affinity between the Basque Country and Idaho, which has the largest Basque community outside Spain.[40]

Little was also a member of a 2011 Idaho trade delegation that traveled to Mexico and Brazil.[41] After the trade mission, he said, “we found tremendous interest and opportunities in both countries for Idaho products and services … This trip strengthened key trade relationships and established new customers for Idaho businesses.” The Idaho Department of Commerce estimated that the mission resulted in sales of more than $30 million.[42]

Legislation

In the 2014 legislative session, Little sponsored Senate Bill 1354, an anti-“patent troll” bill. The bill protects companies from abusive or “bad faith assertions of patent infringement” to collect an extortionate licensing fee.[43][44][45]

Governor of Idaho (2019–present)

2018 election

In June 2016, Little announced his candidacy for the Idaho gubernatorial election in 2018.[46][47] He said that Idaho National Laboratory would be a priority if he became governor.[48]

Little was endorsed by incumbent Governor Otter,[49] former governors Dirk Kempthorne and Phil Batt, and U.S. Senator Jim Risch.[50]

Little speaks during a meeting at the White House with President Trump and Vice President Pence and fellow governors-elect.

During his campaign, Little called for a phased-in $350 million reduction in the state income tax and the elimination of the Idaho grocery tax.[51]

Little won the Idaho Republican Party primary, beating both U.S. Representative Raúl Labrador and businessman Tommy Ahlquist with 37.3% of the vote.[52] In the general election in November, he defeated state Representative Paulette Jordan, the Idaho Democratic Party nominee,[53] by over 130,000 votes.

2022 reelection

In March 2022, Little filed papers to run for a second term in office, having announced his intention to run the previous month.[54][55] He won the Republican nomination in May, defeating Lieutenant Governor Janice McGeachin.[56]

The Democratic nominee in the race was Stephen Heidt. At the same time, an anti-government activist, Ammon Bundy, ran in the race as an independent.[57] Little easily won the November 8 election, certifying the win in every county except Blaine County, which Heidt won.[58][59]

Tenure

In March 2020, Little gained attention for signing two bills into law that addressed transgender people.[60] The first bans transgender women and girls from competing in women’s sports, citing possible unfair physical advantages. The second bill, HB 509, bans transgender people from changing the sex on their birth certificates.[61][62][63]

In 2021, Little signed legislation that raised signature requirements for ballot initiatives.[64] That year, he also signed legislation that would permit harvesting up to 90% of the state’s estimated 1,500 wolves to the minimum level of 150 as set by Idaho’s wolf conservation and management plan; the legislation was backed by the ranching sector of Idaho as well as many in the hunting and fishing community, but strongly opposed by environmental advocates.[65]

Political positions

Abortion

In late April 2021, Little signed House Bill 366, effectively prohibiting abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy, making exceptions for victims of rape, incest, and for medical emergencies. He also said, “We should never relent in our efforts to protect the lives of the preborn” and “Hundreds and hundreds of babies lose their lives every year in Idaho due to abortion, an absolute tragedy.”[66][67]

In March 2022, Little signed Senate Bill 1309 modeled after the Texas Heartbeat Act that prohibited abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy. The bill made exceptions for victims of rape, incest, and for medical emergencies.[68] The Idaho Supreme Court later temporarily blocked the law.[69]

In April 2023, Little signed State House Bill 242, which prohibits “recruiting, harboring, or transporting” minors across state lines for abortions without explicit parental consent. It also makes it illegal to obtain abortion pills for a minor. A conviction for “abortion trafficking” carries a minimum sentence of two years in state prison and a maximum of five years. This is the first anti-abortion bill to prosecute people who travel to states where abortions are legal to undergo the procedure.[70]

Gun control

Little opposes gun control. In May 2021, he signed a bill that would thwart nearly a half-dozen of executive orders from President Joe Biden combating gun control.[71] Little has an A+ rating from the NRA Political Victory Fund for his record on Second Amendment rights and was endorsed in the 2022 election.[72][73]

LGBT rights

In March 2020, Little signed both House Bill 500 and House Bill 509, which ban transgender people who identify as female from playing on athletic teams that don’t align with their sex-at-birth and ban transgender people from changing their gender mark on their birth certificate.[74]

In April 2023, Little signed House Bill 71 into law, banning anyone under the age of 18 from receiving puberty blockers, hormone therapy, or gender-affirming surgery beginning in 2024. Doctors who violate the law face up to ten years in prison. It offers no exemptions for minors currently taking puberty blockers or undergoing hormone therapy.[75]

Marijuana

In a January 2019 interview, Little expressed opposition to legalizing recreational marijuana. He had expressed skepticism about legalizing medical marijuana for patients.[76]

When being asked about marijuana legalization in April 2019, Little said: “If Idahoans want legal marijuana, they elected the wrong guy as governor.” NORML, a group advocating the legalization of marijuana, gave Little an F rating for his policies about reforming marijuana laws.[77][78]

In February 2021, Little signed Senate Bill 1017, which raises the legal THC limit in cannabidiol (CBD) products from 0% to 0.1% THC. The law went into effect on July 1, 2021.[79]

In April 2021, Little signed a bill that would legalize the cultivation and transportation of hemp in Idaho with up to 0.3% THC in it, making Idaho the final state to do so, but the bill would prohibit the sale of hemp products containing any THC.[80]

Capital punishment

In March 2023, Little, a supporter of capital punishment, signed House Bill 186, which adds a firing squad as an alternative form of execution when lethal injection is not available. Idaho is the fifth state to pass such a bill.[81]

Electoral history

Idaho gubernatorial elections: 2018
YearDemocraticVotesPctRepublicanVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
2018Paulette Jordan231,08138.2%Brad Little361,66159.8%Bev “Angel” BoeckLibertarian6,5511.1%Walter L. BayesConstitution5,7871.0%
Idaho Gubernatorial Republican primary election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanBrad Little 72,518 37.3
RepublicanRaúl Labrador63,46032.6
RepublicanTommy Ahlquist50,97726.2
RepublicanLisa Marie3,3901.7
RepublicanSteve Pankey2,7011.4
RepublicanHarley Brown8740.4
RepublicanDalton Cannady5280.3
Total votes194,448 100.0
Idaho Gubernatorial Republican primary election, 2022
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanBrad Little (incumbent) 148,831 52.8
RepublicanJanice McGeachin90,85432.2
RepublicanEd Humphreys30,87711.0
RepublicanSteve Bradshaw5,4701.9
RepublicanAshley Jackson3,1721.1
RepublicanLisa Marie1,1190.4
RepublicanBen Cannady8040.3
RepublicanCody Usabel6800.2
Total votes281,807 100.0

Personal life

Little married Teresa Soulen of Weiser in May 1978; they have two sons and five grandchildren.[9]

References

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  2. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (2018-05-15). “Idaho Primary Election Results”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  3. ^ “Republican Brad Little wins reelection for governor in Idaho”. The San Diego Union-Tribune. November 8, 2022.
  4. ^ a b Shadduck, Louise (1990). Andy Little: Idaho Sheep King. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd. ISBN 0-87004-340-4.
  5. ^ “Students”. Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1973. p. 152.
  6. ^ “Phi Delta Theta”. Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1973. p. 234.
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  50. ^ Category: politics (2018-05-06). “Little gubernatorial campaign announces endorsements”. Idahopoliticsweekly.com. Retrieved 2018-05-14.
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  53. ^ “Report Declaration”. sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-19.
  54. ^ “Idaho Gov. Brad Little running for re-election”. KTVB. February 16, 2022. Retrieved December 11, 2022.
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  57. ^ Colley, Bill (June 10, 2021). “Ammon Bundy to Officially Announce for Idaho Governor”. KLIX (AM). Retrieved June 10, 2021.
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  60. ^ “Idaho Governor Brad Little Signs Anti-Transgender Legislation”.
  61. ^ “Idaho is actually arguing that its hateful birth certificate law isn’t transphobic”. 20 May 2020.
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  64. ^ Epstein, Reid J.; Corasaniti, Nick (2021-05-22). “Republicans Move to Limit a Grass-Roots Tradition of Direct Democracy”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-05-25.
  65. ^ “Bill to kill up to 90% of Idaho wolves signed by governor”. ABC News. Retrieved 2021-05-31.
  66. ^ Caroline Kelly (28 April 2021). “Idaho GOP governor signs ‘heartbeat’ abortion ban into law”. CNN. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  67. ^ “Gov. Little signs ‘fetal heartbeat’ abortion ban bill into law”. ktvb.com. April 27, 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  68. ^ Moseley-Morris, Kelcie (2022-03-23). “Idaho governor signs bill effectively banning most abortions”. Idaho Capital Sun. Retrieved 2022-04-21.
  69. ^ “Idaho Supreme Court temporarily blocks new ban on abortions after six weeks”. USA Today. Retrieved 2022-04-21.
  70. ^ “Idaho governor signs ban on ‘abortion trafficking’. PBS. Retrieved 2023-04-29.
  71. ^ “Idaho governor signs bill to halt Biden moves on gun laws”. AP NEWS. 2021-05-11. Archived from the original on 2021-05-11. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  72. ^ “NRA-PVF | Idaho”. nrapvf.org. NRA-PVF. Archived from the original on November 8, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  73. ^ “NRA Political Victory Fund endorses Brad Little”. KMTV. April 18, 2022. Archived from the original on April 18, 2022. Retrieved December 11, 2022.
  74. ^ “Gov. Little defends two anti-transgender bills he signed into Idaho law”. ktvb.com. April 8, 2020. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  75. ^ Dawson, James. “Gov. Little signs into law healthcare ban for transgender minors”. Boise State Public Radio. Retrieved 29 April 2023.
  76. ^ Duke, Emily (25 January 2019). “Gov. Little talks medical marijuana, possible routes to legalization”. www.kmvt.com. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  77. ^ Russell, Betsy Z. “Little: If Idahoans want legal marijuana, ‘They elected wrong guy as governor’. Idaho Press. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  78. ^ “Idaho”. NORML. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  79. ^ “SENATE BILL 1017 – Idaho State Legislature”. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  80. ^ “Idaho Gov. signs bill allowing growing, transport of hemp”. AP NEWS. 2021-04-19. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  81. ^ Maldonado, Mia. “Idaho governor signs bill to allow firing squad as an alternative form of execution”. Idaho Capital Sun. Retrieved 29 April 2023.

External links

Idaho Senate
Preceded by

Judy Danielson
Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 8th district

2001–2002
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 11th district

2002–2009
Succeeded by

Political offices
Preceded by

Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
2009–2019
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Governor of Idaho
2019–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by

Republican nominee for Governor of Idaho
2018, 2022
Most recent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as Vice President

Order of precedence of the United States
Within Idaho
Succeeded by

Mayor of city
in which event is held
Succeeded by

Otherwise Mike Johnson

as Speaker of the House

Preceded by

as Governor of Washington

Order of precedence of the United States
Outside Idaho
Succeeded by

as Governor of Wyoming


X

Brad Little – ID

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Former Positions: Lt. Governor from 2009 – 2019; State Senator from 2001 – 2009

Brad Little served as the 42nd lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2009 to 2019 and as an Idaho state senator from 2001 to 2009.

Quotes: 
Brad Little is committed to making decisions through one lens: the lens of ensuring Idaho’s children and grandchildren have the best opportunities to stay in Idaho and for the ones who have left to return.

Brad has advocated his whole life for limited government. He works to ensure the lightest possible hand of government in the lives of Idaho’s citizens, and he seeks to build the public’s confidence in State government.

A candid conversation with Idaho Gov. Brad Little

OnAir Post: Brad Little – ID

2022 ID Governor Race

Governor Brad Little was elected in 2018 with 59.8% of the vote and is running for reelection to a second term. Incumbent lieutenant governor Janice McGeachin announced a primary challenge to Little, but Little won the Republican primary. Anti-government activist Ammon Bundy also announced a run for the Republican nomination, but switched to an Independent on February 17, 2022.

The Democratic nominee is Stephen Heidt.

Source: Wikipedia

OnAir Post: 2022 ID Governor Race

Stephen Heidt

Current Position: Educator
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2023 Governor

Stephen Heidt is a 4th generation Idahoan and lifelong educator. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and International Relations & Diplomacy in 1986 from BYU Provo. In 1990 he earned his 2nd BA in history and his teaching certificate.

He has five children with his wife, plus two grandchildren, who have all made Idaho their home. His father was a decorated veteran of the Korean War and his uncle is buried in the U.S. WWII Military Cemetery near Florence, Italy. Stephen served in the U.S. Army National Guard for 8 years.

OnAir Post: Stephen Heidt

2022 ID Governor Race

Governor Brad Little was elected in 2018 with 59.8% of the vote and is running for reelection to a second term. Incumbent lieutenant governor Janice McGeachin announced a primary challenge to Little, but Little won the Republican primary.Anti-government activist Ammon Bundy also announced a run for the Republican nomination, but switched to an Independent on February 17, 2022.

The Democratic nominee is Stephen Heidt.

Source: Wikipedia

OnAir Post: 2022 ID Governor Race

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